English Language Languages

Conditional IF Grammar Rules [PDF]

THE ZERO CONDITIONAL

The zero conditional of “IF” is used for when the time being referred to is now or always and the situation is real and possible. The zero conditional of “IF” is often used to refer to general truths. The tense in these two parts of the sentence is the simple present. In zero conditional of “IF” sentences, the word “if” can be replaced by the word “when” without changing the meaning.

If this thing happens that thing happens.

TYPE 1 CONDITIONAL

The type 1 conditional of “IF” is used to refer to the future or present where the situation is real. The type 1 conditional of “IF” refers to a possible condition & its probable result. In these sentences the if clause is in the simple present, and the main clause is in the simple future.

If you don’t hurry you will miss the train.

TYPE 2 CONDITIONAL

The type 2 conditional of “IF” is used to refer to a time that is now or any time, and a situation that is unreal. These sentences are not based on fact. The type 2 conditional of “IF” is used to refer to a hypothetical condition and its probable result. In type 2 conditional sentences, the if clause uses the simple past & the main clause uses the present conditional.

If I spoke Italian I would be working in Italy.

TYPE 3 CONDITIONAL

The type 3 conditional of “IF” is used to refer to a time that is in the past, and a situation that is contrary to reality. The facts that they are based on are the opposite of what is expressed. The type 3 conditional of “IF”  is used to refer to an unreal past condition & its probable past result. In type 3 conditional sentences, the if clause uses the past perfect, and the main clause uses the perfect conditional.

If it had rained you would have gotten wet.




See Also
The Simple Future Tense “PDF”

Download PDF

Recommended Articles
   

error: Content is protected !!