Kind regards Vs. Yours sincerely

Before you write your name at the end of an email or letter, you usually include a small signoff with something like “Best regards”, “Kind regards”, “Best wishes”, or “Yours sincerely”. But when and how should you use “Kind regards”, or “Yours sincerely”?

Kind regards meaning

To understand Kind regards meaning, “Kind regards” is a more formal version of “Best regards” that expresses respect. It can be used to introduce yourself to a supervisor or executive in your company via email.

Kind regards uses in an email

“Kind regards” should be used when you want the recipient to do something for you. Because this sign-off is more formal than “Best regards,” it should be reserved for the most formal emails; otherwise, your recipient may assume you’re always formal, which isn’t the impression you want to make.

Here are some examples of when you might use Kind regards:

1- When emailing any company, at any time.
2- When you introduce yourself to any mutual friends.
3- When you are dealing with new clients or companies for the first time.

Yours sincerely meaning

In British English, “Yours sincerely” is also used as a sign-off, but only when the recipient is known. This means that the recipient’s name is in the email opener, and you know who they are. If the recipient is unknown, do not use “Yours sincerely.”

“Yours sincerely” is a very professional way to end a business email or letter, but if you’re a small business, we recommend something a little less formal. Leave “Yours sincerely” for corporate companies and make your email more personal by using “Kind regards” or “Best regards” instead. However, if you’re writing to a corporate company about a potential job or internship and they’re likely to use “Yours sincerely” in a more formal setting, we’d recommend using it as well.

Yours sincerely Example

Dear Mr. Mark,

It was a pleasure to meet you last week. I was grateful for the opportunity to interview for the position of Public Relations Campaign Manager at your organization.

Yours sincerely,

Alex Graham

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