interviewer

Top 22 questions to ask your interviewer

Your interview is drawing to an end. You know you did well. The Interviewer seemed to like many of your answers. You found out that you were cheering on the same sports team and it brought you a bit closer. You definitely feel like you have a head start to land the job. And then … the killer question: “Do you have any questions for me?”.

Has this ever happened to you? If so, don’t worry. This is a very simple situation that we can help you get out of! It’s always a good idea to have a series of questions in the bank to answer this seemingly harmless one. Many are preparing to answer the tough questions about their strengths and weaknesses, as well as their work experience, but forget that they should also ask questions to get to know their future employer better.

Your interviewer will expect you to have questions. Not asking questions might make you feel like you’re unprepared or uninterested, so take the time to ask yourself questions to ask the hiring manager.

Asking questions can also give you the opportunity to further highlight some of your qualities, skills and experiences.

Asking very specific questionswhen answering will allow you to impress your potential employer with your knowledge and interest in the industry while determining if this is the right job for you.

Don’t miss this invaluable opportunity to learn about the company that might hire you and to show that you value the opportunity.

People have often talked about the questions to avoid in a job interview, but if we look at the other side of the coin, there are some awesome questions you absolutely should ask.

During a job interview, it’s of course up to you to answer the questions and sell yourself. But you also need to determine if you are going to be able to flourish in this position. Here’s how.

Of course, during a job interview, it is above all you, the candidate, who are supposed to answer the questions. You live to best sell your skills, match the required profile and highlight what you can bring to the company.

But it is not all to pass the selection. To be successful, the company you are going to join must also be a good choice for you. You devote more than 40 hours per week to your work. It is essential to be able to flourish in this context. We have compiled an inventory of 22 questions to ask recruiters to be fixed on this topic.

Make A List Of Interview Questions

Plan ahead and ask interview questions of your choice. You do not just try to get this job – you also interviewing the employer to assess whether this company and the position you are suitable .

Asking questions is a great way to delve deeper into the corporate culture and the day-to-day responsibilities of the job, so if you’re hired, your first week in the job won’t come with any major surprises.

The Best Questions To Ask The Interviewer

Here is a list of questions to ask the interviewer so that you can make sure the company is a good match for your qualifications and interests.

Questions to ask during a job interview

1. How would you describe the ideal employee?

2. Can you tell me about the team?

3. How would you describe your management style?

4. What aspect of your job do you like the most?

5. What does a normal day look like at this job?

6. How do you go about evaluating employees?

7. Tell me an amazing thing about working in this company?

8. What do you think is the most important quality for this position?

9. Where do you see the business in 5 years?

10. What are some of the most important challenges facing this service right now?

11. What does the typical career path for an employee in this position look like?

12. Is this a new position or will I be replacing someone?

13. How does [the current industry trend] influence your organization?

14. Do you have any doubts about me that I could answer?

15. What will be the next steps in the hiring process?

16. What are your expectations?

17. What are the main goals to achieve with this position?

18. What are the most important skills for this job?

19. How soon do you expect to make your decision?

20. Do you have any hesitation regarding my application?

21. What style of management do you recommend?

22. Why do you like working for this company?

1. How would you describe the ideal employee?

Each hiring manager has a different idea of ​​what makes the ideal employee. Therefore, it never hurts to ask what you are looking for. You might as well get unexpected information that doesn’t appear in the job description. Just remember to nod and then describe how you use the same skills!

2. Can you tell me about the team?

If you’ve been in the workforce for a long time, you probably know that the people you meet are just as important as the work you do. Nice co-workers can make work that is, in and of itself, uninteresting easier. For this reason, it is always recommended that you get an idea of ​​the team you will be a part of before accepting the position.

3. How would you describe your management style?

No two employees are the same and it is the same for bosses. This requires your prospective boss to know their strengths and weaknesses, although they will likely only present you on the bright side! Even so, you might get an interesting glimpse into his style of work and determine if it suits yours.

4. What aspect of your job do you like the most?

No one knows the company better than the people who work there. Even if you’ve heard of the company and educated yourself about what they do there, the answer to this question might tell you more about it. Plus, this is a fun and positive question. It is almost impossible for this question to turn sour.

5. What does a normal day look like at this job?

Sometimes, job descriptions do not clearly reveal how much time you will need to devote to different tasks or even precisely what those tasks will be. This question will give you a better idea of ​​what tasks you will be doing on a daily basis and how you will spend most of your time.

6. How do you go about evaluating employees?

It is interesting to know the parameters that will be used to assess your degree of success before accepting the position. These will help you get to know the position better and whether its requirements match the style of work you advocate. If the gap is too big, it’s better to know it now rather than after you’ve been hired.

7. Tell me an amazing thing about working in this company?

When faced with this question, your interviewer will most likely bring up a positive aspect, such as an added benefit that is not reflected in the job description. Remain calm even if your interviewer hesitates for a moment before answering, since it can be difficult to answer such a question, especially if you don’t expect it?

8. What do you think is the most important quality for this position?

It may be interesting to watch your interviewer analyze the complexity of a job description to come up with a single quality. This will help you focus on what is most important as well as confirming that you have what you are looking for, while hoping that it gives you some examples.

9. Where do you see the business in 5 years?

It’s always good to know what current employees have to say about their employer. You are looking for someone who is enthusiastic and positive about the future of the company. If the interviewer is on his guard and says nothing, see his reaction as a red flag.

10. What are some of the most important challenges facing this service right now?

This question represents an opportunity for you to discuss how you can help resolve some of the major issues facing the business today. However, be careful not to insult the team currently in place. You want to present yourself as a significant addition to the current team, but not as a savior who is being parachuted in to fix what current employees are failing to correct.

11. What does the typical career path for an employee in this position look like?

This is a great question that will help you understand the possibility of advancement within the company. If having a hierarchy that you can work your way up to is important to you, this is a great way to educate yourself without directly addressing the issue of promotions, which can seem presumptuous when you are not even told. not yet hired.

12. Is this a new position or will I be replacing someone?

This question will give you an idea of ​​the history of this position and how you should approach it if you are hired. If this is a new position, there is a reason it was created. If you are going to replace another employee, you will have to take on their duties whether you like it or not. It is always interesting to know this background.

13. How does [the current industry trend] influence your organization?

This is a double-edged sword. It shows that you know the industry while expressing your interest in the company. Be sure to ask an insightful question that expresses a legitimate concern for the business (and the answer to which isn’t obvious or publicly known!)

14. Do you have any doubts about me that I could answer?

This question may seem bold at first and scare some job seekers, but it is smart for a very good reason: your interviewer recognizes that you are exceptional or you will have the opportunity to dispel any doubts he may have. as to why you are the ideal candidate for the job.

15. What will be the next steps in the hiring process?

There is nothing special about being interested in the next steps, but it is also a good way to conclude your interview, since it shows that you are interested and eager to participate in the next steps. This will give you an idea of ​​when you should hear from the recruiter next time and, therefore, when you should follow up, if applicable.

16. What are your expectations?

By asking this question, you show the employer that you are not only ready for the job, but that you also have a desire to perform in order to meet the company’s expectations. It’s also a great opportunity to learn more about what will be expected of you if you land the job in order to get off on the right foot. Another way to phrase this question would be to ask the recruiter what their vision for success is. This will help you learn how you can meet their needs without making any mistakes.

17. What are the main goals to achieve with this position?

You can ask the recruiter what a typical day in this role is to learn more about the tasks to be performed on a daily basis. But if you want to know what your first few days in the office will really be like, ask the recruiter about the main things to do after you start your job. Knowing what to do in the short and medium term will make it easier to see if this job is for you. And if so, you’ve taken a great opportunity to show the recruiter how seriously you take this job.

18. What are the most important skills for this job?

In the same vein as the two previous questions, this one will allow you to determine if you have what it takes to fill this position. This is also the time to educate yourself about the qualities valued within the company. If the recruiter describes to you someone who speaks easily in public and has a natural talent for a salesperson when you are rather reserved and would have difficulty selling a DVD to a movie enthusiast, you will quickly know that this job probably isn’t for you .

19. How soon do you expect to make your decision?

Don’t you dare ask this question? You should! This is the only way to know what the next steps in the recruiting process are. This will help you know if you might be called for a second interview. Also, if you are told that you should have a response in two weeks and you still have no news a month later, you can either relaunch or move on to the next issue if you’ve found a job that suits you more In the meantime.

20. Do you have any hesitation regarding my application?

Do you absolutely value this job and don’t want to miss out on the opportunity to get it? Don’t hesitate to ask the employer if they have any doubts about you. You will be able to clarify any points that were not clear, answer any additional questions he may have and prove that his fears are unfounded and that you are perfect for this position. Asking him this question will also show him that you can take criticism and that you want to keep learning and improving. And if it ever really doesn’t work out, you’ll know what to expect and don’t waste time giving yourself false hope.

21. What style of management do you recommend?

Want to maximize your chances of not hitting a bad boss? Asking him what constitutes effective communication in his eyes or how he manages his boss-employee relationship will allow you to quickly see if your personalities are compatible. It’s also a good way to quickly understand what works and what to avoid with your future boss. You will also learn important information about the culture of the company and find out if your values ​​match those of your potential boss.

22. Why do you like working for this company?

If the person interviewing you thinks a little too long before answering this question, consider it a wake-up call. On the contrary, if she is passionate and quickly gives you multiple reasons that make her happy to get up every morning to go to work, you will know that there is a good chance that you are enjoying yourself there too.

So, during your next interview you will be well prepared, because there is worse than not asking questions: asking one that has already been answered during the interview!

More Question You Can Ask Your Interviewer

Questions about the position

  • Why is this particular position available?
  • How will my results be evaluated and how often is my work checked?
  • What are the long-term professional opportunities for me in this position?
  • What support can I get to improve my qualifications and skills?
  • What are the main challenges associated with this position?
  • How would you describe the daily work of someone in this position?

Questions about your colleagues

  • How many people will be working directly with me and what are their responsibilities?
  • How does my team fit into the overall organization of the company?
  • What is the working atmosphere within the team?

Questions about your supervisor / manager

  • How does the superior / manager manage his team?
  • What do you think are his strengths as a manager?
  • What do you like best about this business?
  • What qualities do you value in your employees?

Questions about the company

  • How would you describe the culture of the company?
  • What type of management is usually done within the company as a whole?
  • What are the main challenges that the company is currently facing?
  • What are the short and long term goals of the company?
  • What is the definition of success for the company?

Questions Not To Ask In A Job Interview

There are a few questions you should avoid asking, since they won’t present you in a positive light.

  • What is this company doing? (Do your research in advance!)
  • If I get the job, when can I take vacation time off? (Wait until you get the offer to mention past engagements.)
  • Can I change my schedule if I get the job? (If you need to figure out the logistics of getting to work, don’t mention it now.)
  • Did I get the job? (Don’t be impatient, they will tell you.)

See Also

How to answer what interests you about this position?
How to answer whey are you leaving your current job?